Man tries to kill spider, burns down house

We tried to warn you, spider-slaying arsonists. A Seattle house went up in flames last night after a tenant tried to flush out an eight-legged foe in his laundry room by setting it on fire using a lighter and spray paint, KOMO News reports.

A spokesman for the Seattle Fire Department says that the man couldn’t put out the fire himself and that firefighters originally fought the fire from a distance because there was speculation of ammunition inside the home — that threat was later ruled out, according to KIRO-TV.

There were said to be no injuries, but the rental home and its contents reportedly sustained $60,000 worth of damage.

While all this was going on, neighbors scrambled to hose down their own homes and yards to keep the fire away. “I saw flames coming out of the side of the house and heard popping sounds,” one of the neighbors tells KIRO-TV.

Another neighbor adds, “There were giant clouds of smoke pouring out of the windows.”

The Red Cross is said to be helping the man and a second tenant (his mother) find new lodgings.

And in case you’re wondering who would actually try to kill a spider this way: This isn’t the first case to occur.

Credit: http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2014/07/16/seattle-house-fire-spider/12724817/

 

Termites cause over 5 billion in the United States annually.

Arizona Pest Control has bee protecting Tucson form termites for over 65 years and highly recommends getting an annual termite inspection from trained and licensed termite inspection experts.

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Here are a few clues that termites may be present in a home:

  1. Mud tubes (used by termites to reach a food source) on the exterior of the home
  2. Soft wood in the home that sounds hollow when tapped
  3. Darkening or blistering of wood structures
  4. Cracked or bubbling paint
  5. Small piles of feces that resembles sawdust near a termite nest
  6. Discarded wings near doors or on windowsills, indicating swarmers have entered the home

Call us today at 886-PEST for a free Termite Inspection.

 

  • Thoroughly inspect the entire room before unpacking, including behind the headboard, under lights, and inside dressers, drawers, sofas and chairs.
  • Pull back the sheets and inspect the mattress seams and box springs, particularly at the corners, for pepper-like stains, spots or shed bed bug skins.
  • Place suitcase in a plastic trash bag during the duration of your trip to ensure that bed bugs cannot take up residence there prior to departure.
  • Do not place luggage on upholstered surfaces. The safest place is in the bathroom in the middle of a tile floor or on a luggage rack after it has been thoroughly inspected. Do not use a luggage rack if it has hollow legs, where bed bugs may hide unseen.

If You Suspect Bed Bugs Are In Your Hotel Room:

  • Notify management and request to change rooms immediately.
  • Do not move to a room adjacent and/or directly above/below the suspected infestation. Bed bugs can easily hitchhike via housekeeping carts, luggage and even through wall sockets. If an infestation is spreading, it typically does so in the rooms closest to the origin.

When You Arrive Home:

  • Inspect your suitcases outdoors before bringing them into the house.
  • Vacuum your suitcase thoroughly before storing it. Consider using a garment hand steamer to steam your luggage, which can kill any bed bugs or eggs that may have traveled home with you.
  • Wash and dry all of your clothes – even those that have not been worn – on hot cycles.
  • Keep clothes that go to the dry cleaner in a sealed plastic bag until they can be transported.

Arizona Pest & Termite Control Company

ArizonaPestControl

Tucson Pack Rat Control Tips

Pack rats are a relatively minor structure infesting pest; however, they can carry disease and

ectoparasites and they can also do damage to wiring and landscaping.

The key to pest management is to deny them shelter and nesting sites. Follow these steps:

  • Avoid storage boxes and other items that may give shelter to pack rats on patios or along the sides of buildings and walls.
  • Store fire wood off the ground and away from any wall or other obstruction.
  • Keep carports clear of stored items to eliminate hiding places.
  • If pack rats have been in a car engine compartment, have it steam cleaned to destroy the scent and leave the hood open at night. Leaving the carport light on at night will help.
  • Rodent-proof/exclude all possible entry points; be sure the pack rat is not trapped inside the building!
  • A pack rats  can squeeze through a half-inch hole.
  • Be sure doors fit correctly and have door sweeps.
  • Be sure windows are screened properly.
  • Exhaust fans and ventilation vents on the roof/attic level should be Screened.
  • Keep ground covering plants cut/mow low to the ground.
  • Do not allow Agaves, Aloe, Yuccas and other cacti to grow in tight groups.
  • Do not allow a skirt of dead branches to form on Agaves and Yuccas.
  • Keep the bases trimmed.
  • Thin out dense cactus and landscape plantings.
  • Trim off any paddles that turn sideways providing overhead shelter.

Happy 4th of July!

June Newsletter from Arizona Pest Control ~ Termite or Ant?

Tucson Pest Control

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