Termites Destroy Artifacts Taken From A Spanish Galleon

Saipan is one of the Mariana islands located near the country of Japan. Technically, Saipan is a part of the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, which is governed by the United States. Saipan provided an important base for American military operations during World War Two. In addition to the island’s American history, the landscape is picturesque and an ideal tropical vacation spot. Not surprisingly, the island has seen many tourists from all corners of the globe. One of the island’s primary tourist destinations was The National Museum Institute of the History of Art, Conservation and Museology (NMI). This museum housed a variety of different historical treasures collected from regions all over the globe. Unfortunately, the museum has fallen into disrepair and is closed to the public at the moment. It turns out that the museum does not have enough space to store all of the donations that they received from other countries. Therefore the valuable historical treasures that were donated to the museum have been neglected. This neglect eventually led to a widespread termite infestation on the museum property. Many of the priceless donations have been devoured by ravenous termites.

The museum also stores numerous historical items in another smaller building nearby. Sadly, this building has become infested with termites and so have nearly all of the valuable artifacts. These artifacts include an ancient Chamorro canoe, Japanese army uniforms and war gear, photographs that date back to the Japanese era and artifacts obtained from the Spanish galleon Nuestra Senora de la Concepcion. Many centuries old texts and artwork were also destroyed by termites. Now museum officials do not want to transport any of the remains of the historical artifacts to the museum as preventing the further spread of the termites is considered a priority. Nobody yet knows what will become of the surviving artifacts.

Do you think that the termite infestation could have been imported to Saipan through an infested donation?

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